2010 Session Descriptions

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29th

8:30 to 10:00 AM, Grand Ballroom C-D
Plenary Session I: The Marketplace’s Driving Forces – Where Are We Headed?

The conference opens with a thorough assessment of the key drivers in the current and future environment for electronics stewardship and recycling in North America.
-- Moderator: Suzanne Rudzinski, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

WHAT’S AHEAD IN 2010?
A leading market analyst comes to our stage to provide an extensive overview of today’s IT market dynamics and offer his professional projections of the key trends affecting the e-scrap market. This assessment includes extensive details on current trends in corporate IT asset disposal (ITAD) programs.
-- Chris Adam, Converge IT

HOW DO CONSUMER ELECTRONICS PRODUCERS FIT IN WITH END-OF-LIFE?
Huge volumes of consumer electronics are sold every day and stunning new products are brought to the market with increasing frequency. Electronics makers know consumers are eager for recycling options and they have developed various was to address this issue. What are the key environmental drivers in today’s consumer electronics market? A key industry leader explains it all.
– Walter Alcorn, Consumer Electronics Association

HOW ARE RECYCLING’S BROADEST TRENDS AFFECTING THE E-SCRAP INDUSTRY?
The recovery and processing of obsolete electronics occurs in a wide ranging policy and regulatory environment. What are the fundamental issues in the broader electronics recycling industry? Are policy concerns being debated in Congress likely to have an effect on electronics recycling? What are the crucial recycling industry trends to monitor? We’ve invited the head of the nation’s principal recycling industry group, which includes a growing e-scrap division, to provide us her overview.
– Robin Wiener, Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries

10:45 AM to 12:15 PM, Grand Ballroom C and D
Plenary Session II: Issues in Global Responsibility

The conference’s second session addresses issues affecting the environmental impact of using and recovering electronics, both in North America and abroad.
-- Moderator: Jeff Sacre, CHWMEG, Inc.

WHAT’S UP IN EFFORTS TO INCLUDE ENVIRONMENTAL ELEMENTS IN ELECTRONICS DESIGN?
A multi-stakeholder initiative to reward electronics producers for designing and marketing environmentally sensible products is having a sizable effect on the electronics recycling industry. An executive with the program has been invited to New Orleans to offer an update on the EPEAT’s revised criteria and to describe what we’ll see in the new EPEAT standard.
-- Wayne Rifer, EPEAT and the Green Electronics Council

HOW WILL ELECTRONICS RECYCLING BE AFFECTED BY NEW REGULATIONS IN CHINA?
China is the largest market for obsolete electronics shipped from Europe and North America. A new set of environmental regulations has been introduced in that country to control the importation and management of these scrap volumes. A top analyst will describe current and future potential regulations. Are these new rules a barrier or opportunity for global trade? Will China’s “circular economy” policies lead to increased collections and processing in that country?
-- Tad Ferris, Holland + Knight

WHY IS INTERPOL INTERESTED IN ELECTRONICS RECYCLING?
Interpol, the world’s largest international police organization, with 188 member countries, has launched a major initiative to investigate the illegal trade of scrap electronics. For example, the organization’s Pollution Crime Working Group is assessing the potential link between organized crime and e-waste exporting. A summary of Interpol’s current and future efforts will be offered.
-- Emile Lindemulder, Interpol


1:30 to 3:00 PM, Grand Ballroom C
Concurrent Session A: Recent Compelling Research Findings

A number of university researchers are hard at work assessing important aspects of electronics product stewardship. This panel offers attendees a clear overview of some of the key assessments recently completed.
-- Moderator: Henry Leineweber, E-Scrap News

THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF EXPORT BANS
Recent research concluded that efforts to ban the exporting of obsolete electronics from North America, based on environmental concerns, would likely make this growing problem even worse. This fascinating conclusion will be the topic of this important presentation.
-- Eric Williams, Arizona State University

CRT GLASS RECYCLING IS SUSTAINABLE
A commonly-heard notion is that the CRT market is being eliminated by the sales of flat-panel devices. MIT researchers have shown that the CRT industry is thriving in developing markets, and that the demand for recycled lead glass from old CRTs will remain viable for some time. The research findings and their implications will be thoroughly discussed.
-- Jeremy Gregory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

CAN E-WASTE GENERATION BE PREDICTED?
A researcher in the Pacific Northwest has completed a life-cycle analysis of flat-panel monitor production to determine what materials are in them and what processing tools are needed to recycle them. In addition, this project developed a model that predicts e-scrap generation for a specific community.
-- Joyce Cooper, University of Washington


1:30 to 3:00 PM, Grand Ballroom D
Concurrent Session B: Critical E-Scrap Processing Trends

Rising volumes of old electronics are processed for the recovery of parts and materials. Doing these tasks effectively and efficiently is the key to operational success and profitability. This panel will provide practical advice on how to improve the processing of electronics.
-- Moderator: Jack Himes, Pennsylvania Recycling Markets Center

HOW CAN E-PLASTICS BE IDENTIFIED AND SORTED?
Research undertaken over the past five years by the conference organizers shows that the management of scrap plastics from obsolete electronics is one of the largest barriers to effective e-scrap processing. Important research by the American Chemistry Council indicates that new ways of automatically identifying plastics by resin and sorting this mixture are now commercially available. A research summary is provided.
-- Kim Holmes, 4R Sustainability

THE EVOLUTION OF E-SCRAP PROCESSING
Each year The E-Scrap Conference asks technical experts from selected processing firms to provide detailed descriptions of their newly designed and built facilities. This year’s panel offers a global look, with large plants in Denmark, Canada and the U.S. being featured. The panelists will provide their learning experiences in successfully processing scrap electronics.
-- Michael Averhoff, Averhoff S/A
-- Jim Cunningham, Ecovery
-- Gary Powers, eCycle Solutions

3:30 to 5:00 PM, Grand Ballroom C
Concurrent Session C: The Current Landscape in CRT Glass Recycling

This session focuses on a major issue affecting electronics recycling in North America: How to process and market CRT glass.
-- Moderator: Joe Clayton, Synergy Recycling and WR3A

FEDERAL REGULATION OF CRT GLASS HANDLING
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has in place a CRT glass regulation which has greatly changed the way CRT glass is managed in this country. We’ve asked the EPA official in charge of this issue to describe recent changes to the rule, lay out the agency’s enforcement policies and to assess compliance to the regulation.
-- K.C. Schefski, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

CAN LEAD BE REMOVED FROM CRT SCRAP IN A GLASS FURNACE?
CRT glass recycling has traditionally been dominated by two markets: The use of separated glass to make new CRT glass, and the use of scrap glass in a lead smelter. Now two new options are being brought to the market, one of which entails the removal of the lead in CRT glass in a glass melting system. The commercialization of this technology at a new plant in the United Kingdom is the topic of this presentation.
-- Simon Greer, Nulife Recycling

CAN LEAD BE REMOVED FROM CRT GLASS IN A METAL REFINING PROCESS?
The second new option coming to the recycling market is the removal of lead from CRT glass through a series of processing steps at a precious metals refining plant. Exciting new work by a refiner in California is portrayed in this session’s final presentation.
-- Bill McGeever, ECS Refining

3:30 to 5:00 PM, Grand Ballroom D
Concurrent Session D: Downstream Auditing By OEMs

The major producers of electronics not only generate scrap in the manufacturing and sales operations, they also provide take back options to their customers. As a result, they have extensive agreements with e-scrap collectors, processors and end users. How do they assure that their contractors are doing the right job environmentally? We’ve asked environmental managers at top OEMs to lay out how they handle downstream auditing.
-- Moderator: Clare Lindsay, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
-- Ken Turner, Hewlett Packard
-- Doug Smith, Sony
-- Rich Vernam, Panasonic

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30th

8:30 to 10:00 AM, Grand Ballroom C and D
Plenary Session III: Learning Lessons from Europe

The second day of the conference features thorough assessments of electronics recycling policies and trends in Europe. Current and proposed changes to how obsolete electronics are collected and recycling in more than two-dozen European countries will result in significant industry changes globally.
-- Moderator: Sarah Westerveldt, Basel Action Network

RECASTING WEEE
A pan-European initiative – called the WEEE Recast – is looking at ways to revise and update Europe’s landmark e-scrap recovery regulation, the Waste Electronics and Electrical Equipment (WEEE) rules. A draft report has been issued, and if approved, significant changes will take place in 2012, including an expansion of the number of obsolete products targeted. What does this mean for e-scrap recycling worldwide? A leading expert offers his views.
--Jaco Huissman, WEEE Recast

STEPPING AHEAD
StEP (Solving the E-Waste Problem) is an international initiative involving industry members, academics and others that is designed to develop and offer important information on a neutral basis. Initial efforts have focused on ways to optimize the life-cycle of electronics and to maximize the reuse the recovery of materials from these products. A top StEP executive will give an update on this important work.
-- Jean Cox-Kearns, Dell Europe, StEP

A NEW STANDARD
In 2008 the European Union announced a multi-year project by the WEEE Forum – called WEEELABEX – to lay down European standards for the collection, processing and recycling of obsolete electronics and electrical equipment. Included are standards for monitoring processors. The WEEELABEX project director will provide complete details in this precedent-setting effort.
-- Pascal Leroy, WEEE Forum

10:30 AM to Noon, Grand Ballroom C
Concurrent Session E: Electronics Reuse and Refurbishment

A backbone of today’s electronics recycling industry is the reselling and refurbishment of scrap electronics. The E-Scrap Conference offers a high-level panel looking at key reuse and refurbishment issues.
--- Moderator: Sean Nicholson, Microsoft

A LARGE OEM’S EFFORTS TO HELP RECYCLING THROUGH DESIGN
One of the world’s largest computer producers has used a comprehensive survey of e-scrap firms to aid the company’s equipment designers to help make computers that are easier to process when they reach their end of life. A corporate environmental executive will describe how this design process operates.
-- Mike Watson, Dell, Inc.

THE BIG ISSUES IN REFURBISHMENT
More than 1,000 North American non-profit organizations and private companies refurbish old computers. This industry sector has undergone significant changes in the last year. Microsoft now manages the program allowing specific refurbishers to install and use Microsoft operating systems. In addition, a new trade association is being launched. A comprehensive update on these and other issues is offered at this session.
-- Willie Cade, PC Rebuilders and Recyclers

HOW ARE CANADA’S PROGRAMS ADDRESSING REUSE?
The vast majority of Canadians live in provinces with producer responsibility programs targeting specific electronics, including computers and televisions. Reuse has been a sizable policy and political issue in Canada, and we’ve asked an industry official involved in three of the programs to point out the learning lessons from Canada.
-- Sean De Vries, eStewardship Canada

10:30 AM to Noon, Grand Ballroom D
Concurrent Session F: State and Local Programs Move Forward

All recycling is local, and more and more U.S. and Canadian communities are provided e-scrap recycling services as a result of new state and provincial legislation. This morning’s session looks at some key trends and concerns in mandated recovery systems.
--- Moderator: Carole Cifrino, Maine Department of Environmental Protection

WHAT DO THE NUMBERS SHOW?
Numerous state electronics collection and processing programs have moved beyond the start-up phase and are now fully operational. As a result, collection data over several years is available. What does this data tell us? Are current programs attaining their sometimes lofty recovery goals? What advice can be generated from an analysis of collection data? These questions and others will be answered by a leading expert.
-- Jason Linnell, National Center for Electronics Recycling

E-SCRAP’S FIRST BIG LAWSUIT
Several years ago America’s largest city pushed ahead with an innovative approach to recovering obsolete electronics. Some segments of industry hated the measure and a federal lawsuit ensued. The internal battles in New York City are a learning lesson for those wanting to move forward in electronics product stewardship. We’ve asked one of the parties to tell the full story.
-- Kate Sinding, Natural Resources Defense Council

CAN A STATE PROGRAM BE TURNED AROUND?
A prominent environmental organization in Texas has issued an important report describing the good and the bad results of that state’s mandated collection and processing system. What do the numbers say about the performance of the take back efforts of various original equipment producers? Is the Texas program due for remodeling? If so, why?
-- Robin Schneider, Texas Campaign for the Environment

1:00 to 2:30 PM, Grand Ballroom C and D
Plenary Session IV: The Realities of Certification and Auditing

Environmental health and safety issues are rated by many processors of obsolete electronics as their greatest concern in 2010. Pressure is being exerted on e-scrap firms by governmental officials, equipment makers, e-scrap generators and environmental organizations to assure that processors are doing their job correctly. We’ve asked some highly skilled experts to describe how they went about becoming certified and audited. This includes firms holding R2 and eStewards® certificates. We’ve also asked the top executive of a Canadian industry group to describe how certification and auditing of e-scrap processors occurs in that country. Come to this session to receive extremely useful and practical advice from those in the trenches. The learning lessons from this session will save you time and money. -- Moderator: Jerry Powell
-- Shelagh Kerr, Electronics Product Stewardship Canada
-- Kelley Keogh, Sin Fronteras EH Consulting
-- Theresa Bauer, Materials Processing
-- Tom Pritchett, Universal Recycling Technologies
-- Peggy Halferty, Total Reclaim